Previous Issues

Welcome to the June issue of AcreageLife. As many of our more astute readers have likely figured out by now, we have themes for each issue. And our theme this month is “Summer Living.” We plan these themes, the articles, and the overall feel of these issues up to a year in advance. Most times this approach works fine, with experience and a little forethought keeping us on target. But this year—or this spring, more specifically—has been, to put it kindly, a bear to try to figure out. Each month seems to be 30 to 45 days in arrears: April felt more like March, May has felt more like April, and May, so far, has been following suit. It’s almost as if a committee was deciding things.As we go to print with the June issue, it’s still mid-May, which is all part of the show. And as was mentioned earlier, looking forward those few weeks or months, then making small adjustments as the deadline approaches usually works well to bring you timely information and entertaining articles. For instance, this very issue was supposed to include a look at a couple...
This is AcreageLife’s Gardening Guide issue. And all month long, as we did what we do to bring the magazine to you, I couldn’t help but think of my grandparent’s “garden.” While it wasn’t unlike many of their neighbor’s gardens at the time, it would definitely be considered a large-scale operation compared to most of today’s outfits. Heck, it was a respectable size compared to many of the produce markets I’ve seen spring up recently. ​​My grandparents lived in Northern Indiana where my grandpa supported his wife and four kids by working as a mechanic at a John Deere dealership. He was proudly blue collar, an inveterate tinkerer, and always put his family first. He was also a bit of a contrarian. Although he worked for a John Deere tractor dealership, he tilled their garden with an ancient Farmall Cub Cadet, which at the time was considered “well-used” and “thrifty,” not hip or vintage in the least. And it was that old Farmall, used to ready the garden each spring and help the occasional neighbor or passing stranger out of a snowy ditch, that best epitomized my grandfather’s ingenuity.When his...
Welcome to the “Spring Planning” issue of AcreageLife magazine. And to be honest, it feels good to finally be able to use the word “spring” and not feel like a hypocrite. This is our second “Spring-something” themed issue for 2014, despite a seemingly endless winter that can be charitably described as “challenging.” You can understand, then, why I felt a little less than honest last month when we were going on and on about “spring this…” and “spring that…” when all I saw out my front window was three feet of snow piled-up along the walk, never mind the accompanying temperatures that were cold enough to make a polar bear think twice about stepping outside.So here we are, in mid-March, putting the finishing touches on our April issue. And finally—I’m almost afraid to say it—it actually feels like springtime. Sure, there’s still a bit of snow on the ground. And if I were a betting man, I’d go as far as putting some money down on “It’s going to snow at least once more this year,” at least in our neck of the woods. But in between the shrinking...
As you may have noticed, we here at AcreageLife like to use themes, or motifs, as a framework for each issue. For example, March’s theme is “Spring Fever.” And generally, when I start writing “From the Editor,” I like to do a little research on the theme if it’s a phrase or a concept that’s been around for awhile. I don’t know about everyone else, but I find that once words or phrases make their way into common usage, it doesn’t hurt to do a little research—often, the original meaning of the phrase can surprise you. “Spring fever” is no exception. I found its definition as convoluted and confusing as any. To the Germans, it means a seasonal tiredness or malaise. Other definitions prattle on about serotonin and melatonin levels being out of whack. I was left scratching my head—since when was “spring fever” a bad thing?  To me, “spring fever” means getting your ya-yas out on the first nice day—typically in March around here—and whooping it up like a goofball. It’s the kind of scene that would terrify people in more temperate locales: motorcyclists...

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